Rehabilitation

DRY NEEDLING

– By Aathi Thirunanthakumar, Physiotherapist at Optimum Health Solutions Croydon Park

DRY NEEDLING

WHAT IS DRY NEEDLING?

Dry Needling is a treatment technique that involves a sterile, single-use, long thin needle being inserted into the muscle to reduce pain, stiffness, and improve function.

Dry needling is not the same as acupuncture. The main difference is that dry needling aims to release myofascial trigger points, whereas acupuncture focuses on restoring the flow of energy (QI) in the body.

A myofascial trigger point is more commonly known as a knot in your muscle. It is characterised by increased sensitivity (painful/sore when pressed). The build-up of these knots in a muscle body can cause increased stiffness, decreased strength, and decreased coordination of that muscle.

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PREPARING FOR YOUR TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

– By Katie Gallagher, Physiotherapist at Optimum Health Solutions Sylvania

Preparing for your Total Hip Replacement (1)

Have you made the decision to have a total hip replacement? Wondering if there is anything you could do to prepare for your surgery? Good news. There is!

You have most likely been suffering from hip/groin pain for quite some time before arriving at the decision for surgery. During this time you have likely become less active due to pain, and your muscles will have suffered the consequences, becoming weak and tight.

Evidence has shown that rehabilitation outcomes (including pain level, range of movement, mobility and strength) post-surgery can be accelerated and improved through a prehabilitation programme.

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IMPROVING YOUR CORE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE IF YOU USE A WHEELCHAIR

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Three fun ways to improve your core strength and endurance if you use a wheelchair

Depending on the type of wheelchair and a person’s abilities, people who use wheelchairs may need even more core strength and endurance compared to those who don’t. This helps them get around, transfer and reach much more easily. An effective, regular exercise routine which targets core strength and endurance can really make an impact on your everyday function. This doesn’t have to be boring, here’s three fun ways to work your core!

1. Boxing 

Boxing is one of the best ways to work your core because it forces you to move your body in so many different directions so quickly.

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Benefit From Hydrotherapy – Advantages of Those Who Utilise It

By Michael Adams Senior Physiotherapist at Optimum Health Solutions – Goulburn 

Hydrotherapy and How it Can Benefit You 2

Hydrotherapy is any form of exercise, which is completed underwater. Here at our clinics, we have a Hydrotherapy pool that can be utilised in many ways. So what conditions is hydrotherapy useful for? And what are the benefits of Hydrotherapy?

Hydrotherapy can increase muscle mass and strength. Resistance training can be completed in Hydrotherapy, for example, walking against a flow of water or using flotation devices such as pool noodles or kicking boards. Pushing these devices underneath the water, as a controlled exercise, constitutes resistance training and will increase strength and muscle mass.

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Arthritis and Hydrotherapy

Written by Susannah Keppo, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from July 2019

Arthritis and Hydrotherapy

NDIS Optimum Health Solutions

For those suffering from arthritis, it can be challenging to find a suitable form of exercise that doesn’t aggravate your joints and cause pain. At a few Optimum studios, we have hydrotherapy pools which have proven to be very beneficial for managing arthritis-related pain, improving overall functioning and enhancing the quality of life.

There are some particular benefits to exercising in the water such as:

  • Therapeutic effect of the water temperature – hydrotherapy pools are typically heated to 33-35 degrees Celsius to provide a warm environment that can loosen up stiff joints and provide relief for sore muscles
  • Most public swimming pools are heated to 26-28 degrees Celsius which is more suitable for those performing lap swimming which is typically more vigorous
  • Hydrostatic pressure – this is the pressure exerted on your body and joints from the water itself.
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Exercise and bone health

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from July 2019

Exercise & Bone Health

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Exercise is a very important component that goes into improving/maintaining an individual’s bone health. Exercise is recognised as one of the most effective lifestyle strategies to help make bones as strong as possible, as well by reducing the risk of fractures later in life. Additionally, having strong bones is a great way to prevent/slow bone loss after menopause and can help improve an individual’s balance/coordination to help prevent the risk of falls. The correct dose of exercise can also help to speed up rehabilitation following a fracture.

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Foot Drop and How to Manage your Condition

Written by Matthew Craig, Exercise Physiologist at Thornleigh . Article from March 2019

Foot Drop and How to Manage your Condition

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Foot drop is caused by a weakness/inability to activate the muscles on the anterior portion of an individual’s lower limb, especially the Tibialis Anterior muscles. The condition causes a weakness in the dorsiflexors of the foot which clear our foot off the ground when walking or running (i.e. pull our toes towards our shin), putting sufferers at a much higher risk of falls and injuries. Drop foot also regular causes patients to present with an abnormal gait, most commonly a high steppage gait, where the hip and knee are flexed excessively to compensate for the lack of foot clearance at the ankle joint.

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The Necessity Of Exercise For People With Parkinson’s Disease: External Movement And Internal Factors Of The Disease

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from January 2019

The Necessity Of Exercise For People With Parkinson’s Disease: External Movement And Internal Factors Of The Disease

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Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive, chronic and neurodegenerative movement disease. Specifically, what has been historically considered a motor disorder, it is characterized by both many motor and non-motor symptoms such as balance decrements, bradykinesia (slow movement), resting tremor, gait disruption and reduced quality of life. PD patients also tend to display a stooped posture when walking, rigidity and postural instability with reductions in speech volume. An iceberg can describe the clinical status of PD; motor symptoms represent the visible portion whereas the various non-motor manifestations represent the most non-visible portion (1).

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How Optimum’s Exercise Physiologists Program for NDIS Participants

Written by Matthew Craig, Exercise Physiologist at Thornleigh. Article from December 2018

How Optimum’s Exercise Physiologists Program for NDIS Participants

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What exactly is an exercise physiologist? Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) AEPs are university qualified allied health professionals equipped with the knowledge, skills and competencies to design, deliver and evaluate safe and effective exercise interventions for people with acute, sub-acute or chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities. So essentially exercise is medicine!

Optimum Health Solutions has really taken the time to understand the NDIS. So when it comes to the NDIS our programs focus around 3 main goals, 3 main goals that most families, support coordinators and participants of the NDIS will be familiar with as they are in every NDIS plan ever!

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Exercise and Prostate Cancer

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from November 2018

Exercise and Prostate Cancer

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Prostate cancer is the most common cancer amongst Australian men, each year there is 20,000 new diagnosis’ and 3300 men die from the disease. Prostate cancer involves an abnormal growth of cells in the prostate gland and can be detected through a blood test. Common treatments for prostate cancer can include surgery, radiation or hormone therapies all of which can be supplemented by exercise to enhance treatment.

If you have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, exercise is an excellent adjunct therapy to reduce symptoms of first-line treatments such as fatigue as well as improve mental health and survival rate.

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