Rehabilitation

How Optimum’s Exercise Physiologists Program for NDIS Participants

Written by Matthew Craig, Exercise Physiologist at Thornleigh. Article from December 2018

How Optimum’s Exercise Physiologists Program for NDIS Participants

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What exactly is an exercise physiologist? Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) AEPs are university qualified allied health professionals equipped with the knowledge, skills and competencies to design, deliver and evaluate safe and effective exercise interventions for people with acute, sub-acute or chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities. So essentially exercise is medicine!

Optimum Health Solutions has really taken the time to understand the NDIS. So when it comes to the NDIS our programs focus around 3 main goals, 3 main goals that most families, support coordinators and participants of the NDIS will be familiar with as they are in every NDIS plan ever!

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Exercise and Prostate Cancer

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from November 2018

Exercise and Prostate Cancer

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Prostate cancer is the most common cancer amongst Australian men, each year there is 20,000 new diagnosis’ and 3300 men die from the disease. Prostate cancer involves an abnormal growth of cells in the prostate gland and can be detected through a blood test. Common treatments for prostate cancer can include surgery, radiation or hormone therapies all of which can be supplemented by exercise to enhance treatment.

If you have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, exercise is an excellent adjunct therapy to reduce symptoms of first-line treatments such as fatigue as well as improve mental health and survival rate.

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Diabetes: Australia’s Silent Problem

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from October 2018

Diabetes: Australia's Silent Problem

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In Australia there are currently over 1 million people with Diabetes, approximately 100,00 new diagnoses each year and it was made a National Health Priority in 1997. Type 2 Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or is unable to utilise the available insulin effectively. This results in increased blood glucose levels. Type 2 Diabetes occurrence is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as diet, exercise, alcohol intake and overweight/obesity. Luckily, however, many of the risk factors for diabetes are modifiable and you can decrease your risk by making healthy lifestyle choices. 

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Neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s Disease

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from October 2018

Neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s Disease

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Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's ability to reorganise itself both in its structure and how it functions. The brain continuously creates new cells (neurogenesis). When we practice new skills or experience new things our brain makes connections (synapses) to these new cells. These new connections are able to form within 15 minutes of a new activity being commenced are strengthened with repetition and weakened when they are not used.

So why is this relevant to Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain.

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Patellofemoral Pain

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from October 2018

Patellofemoral Pain

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Do you experience knee pain in the front of your knee but don’t know why? You may be experiencing what’s called patellofemoral pain syndrome. This condition is multifactorial but can be treated with appropriately prescribed exercise.

In PTFP, the patella may be the main issue whereby it is not in the correct position it should be, leading to pain being felt in the kneecap region. The patella itself may be tilted, shifted or hypermobile. A potential reason for this can be due to a muscle imbalance between two quadriceps muscles sitting either side of the patella – the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis.

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Beyond The Scale

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from Septemeber 2018

Beyond The Scale

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Often when people start out on their weight loss journey they fixate on the numbers on the scale. Decreasing that number is often important, however, what many people are unaware of are the other changes happening with your body that some scales just can’t measure.

  • Changing Body Composition - When we start exercising, there are a lot of changes that occur within our bodies. With exercise, our bodies lose weight and gain muscle, however, this fat loss may not always be visible on the scales. On top of this, exercise reduces the amount of visceral fat (fat around our vital organs, of which you cannot track on your normal scales.
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Stuttering in Children and Adults

Written by Siri Burke, Speech Pathologist at Blacktown. Article from Septemeber 2018

Stuttering in Children and Adults

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Often when I meet someone new at a cocktail party and tell them I’m a speech pathologist, they’ll say ‘Oh like Geoffrey Rush in the King’s Speech!’

Truthfully, providing intervention for clients who stutter is a world away from the Geoffrey’s kooky strategies in the delightful period drama, but similarly, we are able to provide strategies to help people who stutter reduce the severity of their symptoms and improve their communication.

What is stuttering?


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Stuttering affects the fluency of speech. It is characterised by disfluencies or disruptions to a speech of several types;
Repetitions – where a syllable, a whole word, or several words are repeated, e.g.

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Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease & Exercise

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from September 2018

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease & Exercise

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What is it?

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) is a group of genetic disorders presenting with chronic progressive neuropathy affecting motor and sensory nerves (1). The main features of CMT range from mild to severe in severity and involve progressive weakness and impaired sensory function in the upper and lower limbs (2) as muscle atrophy develops with areflexia (absence of neurologic reflexes) (1). The chronic nature of this condition leads to foot and toe deformity with likely involvement of the hands to follow.

Who can help?

Due to this disease being a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease, it is imperative patients receive regular assessments by a Physiotherapist, Exercise Physiologist, and Occupational Therapist to assist in maintaining range of motion for their benefit of appropriate functioning (1).

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The Pilates Reformer

Written by Dean Katselas, Exercise Physiologist at Campbelltown. Article from August 2018

The Pilates Reformer

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Did you know all our studios use a Pilates reformer and Pilates exercises in all their programming?

There is no doubt you have seen or used the great, big, spring-loaded Pilates reformers in each of our clinics at some time during your training at Optimum. This extremely versatile machine allows you to perform a variety of different exercises laying down, sitting, kneeling and standing. It incorporates pushing, pulling and twisting of upper and lower limbs and core. In other words on the reformer, you can train many parts of the body in many different ways all on the one machine.

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THE KNEE UNLOCKING MUSCLE

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from August 2018

The Knee Unlocking Muscle

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An odd place that raises eyebrows when experiencing pain in this area is the posterior knee compartment. There are structures in the back of the knee that are frequently associated with posterior knee pain. One of the involved structures is a small muscle called the popliteus. This muscle is triangular in shape and has what is called a ‘reversed orientation’ (1) meaning the muscle belly inserts distally and the tendon originates proximally.

Issues may arise when the popliteus lacks the mechanism of ‘unlocking’ the knee joint.

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