Motivation

Don’t know where to start with exercise?

Written by Susannah Keppo, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from February 2019

Don’t Know Where To Start With Exercise?

exercise-starting-out-825x510

I often hear from people especially those starting out, that they don’t know where to start with an exercise and healthy eating regime. They often feel very overwhelmed with different choices and styles of exercise, which can leave them fence sitting for a while. In today’s modern society anyone can have access to an exercise program through the internet, magazines, newspapers or word of mouth.

I think this overwhelming choice of exercise types can have a negative impact on society as it can be used as an excuse not to do anything at all.

Read the rest

The Necessity Of Exercise For People With Parkinson’s Disease: External Movement And Internal Factors Of The Disease

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from January 2019

The Necessity Of Exercise For People With Parkinson’s Disease: External Movement And Internal Factors Of The Disease

p_3649_2014_11_03_04_48_11_0

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive, chronic and neurodegenerative movement disease. Specifically, what has been historically considered a motor disorder, it is characterized by both many motor and non-motor symptoms such as balance decrements, bradykinesia (slow movement), resting tremor, gait disruption and reduced quality of life. PD patients also tend to display a stooped posture when walking, rigidity and postural instability with reductions in speech volume. An iceberg can describe the clinical status of PD; motor symptoms represent the visible portion whereas the various non-motor manifestations represent the most non-visible portion (1).

Read the rest

Top 5 – Beat The Heat

Written by Michael Zajc, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from January 2019

Top 5: Beat The Heat

son2016128165434_54

It’s no secret that this time of year is the toughest to find the motivation to exercise. Some of us enjoying some recovery time off work or on holidays, whilst the rest of us are still nursing the food baby that the Christmas period has left us with. And if that wasn’t challenging enough the Australian summer strikes again with another one of its infamous heat waves. But this isn’t an excuse to pack it in and wait until it’s cooled down a bit.

Read the rest

Why Consistency is the Key

Written by Shane Cassel, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from December 2018

Why Consistency is the Key

0_v1pmXh7Dk8a-uQoI

“This pain has been bugging me for years”
“Everything I’ve tried has failed”
“I seem to take one step forward, two steps back”

These are all common phrases that I have heard over the past few years whilst working in the health and fitness industry. It’s distressing for someone to explain to his or her friends and family all the different methods and diets they have tried in his or her quest for a pain-free and healthier lifestyle.

Recently I watched a video of an interview with American actor Will Smith that I thought was a fantastic way of explaining the overarching theme for the methods we use as Exercise Physiologists.

Read the rest

Reversibility And How It Should Influence Your Christmas Choices!

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from December 2018

Reversibility And How It Should Influence Your Christmas Choices!

106737766-authentic-santa-claus-training-in-modern-gym

By the end of the year many people looking forward to enjoying the festive season. For a lot of people, this often involves a lot of eating and drinking! Of course the holiday season is a time to be enjoyed with family and friends, however, it’s important to remember the effect of our choices.

For 11 months of the year, people will train and put in the hard work needed to maintain or achieve their fitness goals. However, around the holiday season, it is common for people to slack off when it comes to maintaining their health.

Read the rest

Peripheral Arterial Disease and Exercise

Written by Dean Katselas, Exercise Physiologist at Campbelltown. Article from October 2018

Peripheral Arterial Disease and Exercise

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to build up of plaques and narrowing of the arteries of critical areas of the body such as the legs, head, and organs. It is most common for PAD to affect the arteries of the leg decreasing oxygen supply to the calf, thigh, and buttocks.

Patients with PAD often have no symptoms however as the disease progresses they being to present with intermittent claudication (IC). IC is characterised by reproducible pain in the muscles of legs, most commonly the calved, during periods of weight-bearing activity that is relieved with rest.

Read the rest

Cystic Fibrosis & Exercise

Written by Gabriel Pisanu, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from October 2018

Cystic Fibrosis & Exercise

What is it, the common treatments, effects on the exercise response, effects of exercise and exercise recommendations.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disorder of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTCR) gene, which is a gene that provides instructions to make the CFTCR protein. Impaired function to this protein can result in secretion of thickened mucus in the lungs and digestive tract, causing damage. This thickened mucus instigates chronic inflammation, infection, and finally, tissue destruction in the airways of the lungs, ultimately resulting in a deterioration in lung function.

Read the rest

Lifestyle Advice – Is it too general?

Written by Susannah Keppo, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from October 2018

Lifestyle Advice – Is it too general?

Stress weight gain

Recently I read an article discussing what the general advice is given to people wanting to lose weight and improve their overall health. There is an abundance of messages and research into the latest weight loss advice and what is most effective. You don’t have to look far to find what the newest weight loss craze is. Generally speaking, once you break it down, the advice is to ‘move more and eat less’. This article discusses how this message is not as helpful as it may seem at first glance, as it is quite general and is lacking specific guidelines.

Read the rest

Diabetes: Australia’s Silent Problem

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from October 2018

Diabetes: Australia’s Silent Problem

Pre-diabetic

In Australia there are currently over 1 million people with Diabetes, approximately 100,00 new diagnoses each year and it was made a National Health Priority in 1997. Type 2 Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or is unable to utilise the available insulin effectively. This results in increased blood glucose levels. Type 2 Diabetes occurrence is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as diet, exercise, alcohol intake and overweight/obesity. Luckily, however, many of the risk factors for diabetes are modifiable and you can decrease your risk by making healthy lifestyle choices. 

Read the rest

Neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s Disease

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from October 2018

Neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s Disease

ext

Neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s ability to reorganise itself both in its structure and how it functions. The brain continuously creates new cells (neurogenesis). When we practice new skills or experience new things our brain makes connections (synapses) to these new cells. These new connections are able to form within 15 minutes of a new activity being commenced are strengthened with repetition and weakened when they are not used.

So why is this relevant to Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain.

Read the rest