Lifestyle

Top 5 – Beat The Heat

Written by Michael Zajc, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from January 2019

Top 5: Beat The Heat

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It’s no secret that this time of year is the toughest to find the motivation to exercise. Some of us enjoying some recovery time off work or on holidays, whilst the rest of us are still nursing the food baby that the Christmas period has left us with. And if that wasn’t challenging enough the Australian summer strikes again with another one of its infamous heat waves. But this isn’t an excuse to pack it in and wait until it’s cooled down a bit.

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How Optimum’s Exercise Physiologists Program for NDIS Participants

Written by Matthew Craig, Exercise Physiologist at Thornleigh. Article from December 2018

How Optimum’s Exercise Physiologists Program for NDIS Participants

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What exactly is an exercise physiologist? Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) AEPs are university qualified allied health professionals equipped with the knowledge, skills and competencies to design, deliver and evaluate safe and effective exercise interventions for people with acute, sub-acute or chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities. So essentially exercise is medicine!

Optimum Health Solutions has really taken the time to understand the NDIS. So when it comes to the NDIS our programs focus around 3 main goals, 3 main goals that most families, support coordinators and participants of the NDIS will be familiar with as they are in every NDIS plan ever!

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Reversibility And How It Should Influence Your Christmas Choices!

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from December 2018

Reversibility And How It Should Influence Your Christmas Choices!

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By the end of the year many people looking forward to enjoying the festive season. For a lot of people, this often involves a lot of eating and drinking! Of course the holiday season is a time to be enjoyed with family and friends, however, it’s important to remember the effect of our choices.

For 11 months of the year, people will train and put in the hard work needed to maintain or achieve their fitness goals. However, around the holiday season, it is common for people to slack off when it comes to maintaining their health.

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A Pain In The Ass

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from December 2018

A Pain In The Ass

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The most prevalent lower limb tendinopathy isn’t located in the knee or ankle, but in fact is in the backside. Gluteal tendinopathy (tendon condition of the bottom muscles) greatly impacts the quality of life as it causes substantial amounts of pain in the lateral aspect of the hips. Women over the age of 40 years are shown to have the highest prevalence of this condition. Although gluteal tendinopathy is evident in sedentary individuals, it is also seen in athletes (particularly runners) (2).
Two of the gluteal muscles, the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus, are currently considered as the main culprits causing the lateral hip pain.

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Exercise and Prostate Cancer

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from November 2018

Exercise and Prostate Cancer

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Prostate cancer is the most common cancer amongst Australian men, each year there is 20,000 new diagnosis’ and 3300 men die from the disease. Prostate cancer involves an abnormal growth of cells in the prostate gland and can be detected through a blood test. Common treatments for prostate cancer can include surgery, radiation or hormone therapies all of which can be supplemented by exercise to enhance treatment.

If you have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, exercise is an excellent adjunct therapy to reduce symptoms of first-line treatments such as fatigue as well as improve mental health and survival rate.

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Peripheral Arterial Disease and Exercise

Written by Dean Katselas, Exercise Physiologist at Campbelltown. Article from October 2018

Peripheral Arterial Disease and Exercise

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to build up of plaques and narrowing of the arteries of critical areas of the body such as the legs, head, and organs. It is most common for PAD to affect the arteries of the leg decreasing oxygen supply to the calf, thigh, and buttocks.

Patients with PAD often have no symptoms however as the disease progresses they being to present with intermittent claudication (IC). IC is characterised by reproducible pain in the muscles of legs, most commonly the calved, during periods of weight-bearing activity that is relieved with rest.

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Cystic Fibrosis & Exercise

Written by Gabriel Pisanu, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from October 2018

Cystic Fibrosis & Exercise

What is it, the common treatments, effects on the exercise response, effects of exercise and exercise recommendations.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disorder of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTCR) gene, which is a gene that provides instructions to make the CFTCR protein. Impaired function to this protein can result in secretion of thickened mucus in the lungs and digestive tract, causing damage. This thickened mucus instigates chronic inflammation, infection, and finally, tissue destruction in the airways of the lungs, ultimately resulting in a deterioration in lung function.

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Lifestyle Advice – Is it too general?

Written by Susannah Keppo, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from October 2018

Lifestyle Advice – Is it too general?

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Recently I read an article discussing what the general advice is given to people wanting to lose weight and improve their overall health. There is an abundance of messages and research into the latest weight loss advice and what is most effective. You don’t have to look far to find what the newest weight loss craze is. Generally speaking, once you break it down, the advice is to ‘move more and eat less’. This article discusses how this message is not as helpful as it may seem at first glance, as it is quite general and is lacking specific guidelines.

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Diabetes: Australia’s Silent Problem

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from October 2018

Diabetes: Australia's Silent Problem

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In Australia there are currently over 1 million people with Diabetes, approximately 100,00 new diagnoses each year and it was made a National Health Priority in 1997. Type 2 Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or is unable to utilise the available insulin effectively. This results in increased blood glucose levels. Type 2 Diabetes occurrence is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as diet, exercise, alcohol intake and overweight/obesity. Luckily, however, many of the risk factors for diabetes are modifiable and you can decrease your risk by making healthy lifestyle choices. 

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Neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s Disease

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from October 2018

Neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s Disease

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Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's ability to reorganise itself both in its structure and how it functions. The brain continuously creates new cells (neurogenesis). When we practice new skills or experience new things our brain makes connections (synapses) to these new cells. These new connections are able to form within 15 minutes of a new activity being commenced are strengthened with repetition and weakened when they are not used.

So why is this relevant to Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain.

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