Lifestyle

Lifestyle Advice – Is it too general?

Written by Susannah Keppo, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from October 2018

Lifestyle Advice – Is it too general?

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Recently I read an article discussing what the general advice is given to people wanting to lose weight and improve their overall health. There is an abundance of messages and research into the latest weight loss advice and what is most effective. You don’t have to look far to find what the newest weight loss craze is. Generally speaking, once you break it down, the advice is to ‘move more and eat less’. This article discusses how this message is not as helpful as it may seem at first glance, as it is quite general and is lacking specific guidelines.

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Diabetes: Australia’s Silent Problem

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from October 2018

Diabetes: Australia's Silent Problem

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In Australia there are currently over 1 million people with Diabetes, approximately 100,00 new diagnoses each year and it was made a National Health Priority in 1997. Type 2 Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or is unable to utilise the available insulin effectively. This results in increased blood glucose levels. Type 2 Diabetes occurrence is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as diet, exercise, alcohol intake and overweight/obesity. Luckily, however, many of the risk factors for diabetes are modifiable and you can decrease your risk by making healthy lifestyle choices. 

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Neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s Disease

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from October 2018

Neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s Disease

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Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's ability to reorganise itself both in its structure and how it functions. The brain continuously creates new cells (neurogenesis). When we practice new skills or experience new things our brain makes connections (synapses) to these new cells. These new connections are able to form within 15 minutes of a new activity being commenced are strengthened with repetition and weakened when they are not used.

So why is this relevant to Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain.

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Weight management and physical health: The role of exercise in tipping energy balance in your favour

Written by George Li, Student at the University of Sydney. Article from October 2018

Weight Management and Physical health: The Role of Exercise in Tipping Energy Balance in your Favour

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What is energy balance?

Energy balance is the balance between the food you eat with your daily physical activity plus the energy your body uses to function at rest (resting metabolic rate aka RMR) as well as the energy your body uses to process the food you eat (thermic effect of food aka TEF). Daily physical activity includes your regular activities including walking to and from transport, gardening, cooking, cleaning etc., as well as exercise.

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Beyond The Scale

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from Septemeber 2018

Beyond The Scale

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Often when people start out on their weight loss journey they fixate on the numbers on the scale. Decreasing that number is often important, however, what many people are unaware of are the other changes happening with your body that some scales just can’t measure.

  • Changing Body Composition - When we start exercising, there are a lot of changes that occur within our bodies. With exercise, our bodies lose weight and gain muscle, however, this fat loss may not always be visible on the scales. On top of this, exercise reduces the amount of visceral fat (fat around our vital organs, of which you cannot track on your normal scales.
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Stuttering in Children and Adults

Written by Siri Burke, Speech Pathologist at Blacktown. Article from Septemeber 2018

Stuttering in Children and Adults

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Often when I meet someone new at a cocktail party and tell them I’m a speech pathologist, they’ll say ‘Oh like Geoffrey Rush in the King’s Speech!’

Truthfully, providing intervention for clients who stutter is a world away from the Geoffrey’s kooky strategies in the delightful period drama, but similarly, we are able to provide strategies to help people who stutter reduce the severity of their symptoms and improve their communication.

What is stuttering?


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Stuttering affects the fluency of speech. It is characterised by disfluencies or disruptions to a speech of several types;
Repetitions – where a syllable, a whole word, or several words are repeated, e.g.

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With Carbs Moderation is Key

Written by Chloe Horne, Accredited Practicing Dietitian at Blacktown. Article from Septemeber 2018

With Carbs Moderation is Key

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Moderation wins!

With all the hype around the high carb and low carb diets lately it can be confusing trying to decide which dietary pattern is best for long-term health. Well, a recent study published in the Lancet Public Health Journal has reported that the answer is neither!

The study used self-reported data from over 15000 Americans over a 25 year period and found that those who ate a moderate carbohydrate diet actually lived 4 years longer than those following a low carbohydrate diet and 1 year longer than those consuming a high carbohydrate diet.

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When Talking Isn’t Enough

Written by Siri Burke, Speech Pathologist at Blacktown. Article from Septemeber 2018

When Talking Isn't Enough

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Lots of children and adults have difficulty speaking, but this doesn’t have to get in the way of their communication!

Alternative and Augmentative Communication (or AAC) is a term used to describe a therapy approach that seeks to increase someone’s ability to communicate and participate in their preferred activities, often using more than one way of communicating.

This can include lots of things in different combinations, for example;

  •  Speech or Vocalisations
  • Gesture and Body Language
  • Signing (Auslan or Key Word Sign)
  • Pictures
  • Communication Boards
  • High tech devices that do the talking for you (iPad apps or stand-alone devices)

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Marion Baird Success Story

Written by Michael Zajc, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from September 2018

Marion Baird Success Story

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Here at Optimum Health Solutions, we have many success stories in all different areas of health and fitness. Recently I had the pleasure of meeting and working with Marion. Marion is a true testament that age is just a number and that injuries and obstacles can be overcome with a little hard work to achieve your goals. Prior to her competition, Marion worked with us for 2 months where we worked on improving her injuries and allowing her to continue to train at a high intensity and volume without the risk of injury. 

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Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: It’s not ok to leak!

Written by Sarah Hillman, Studio Manager at Sylvania. Article from August 2018

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction:  It’s not ok to leak!

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Many women and men will experience pelvic floor problems during their lifetime. This includes incontinence, prolapse, pelvic pain and/or leakage with jumping, coughing or sneezing. Women are more often affected, with one in two women experiencing some symptoms in their lifetime. Pelvic floor dysfunction can have significant impacts on quality of life, through uncomfortable or painful symptoms, limiting the physical activity sufferers can safely perform as well as potentially embarrassing situations where leakage could occur. We incorrectly accept that this is a function of aging and change our life to accommodate pelvic floor dysfunction.

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