Lifestyle

Can you eat yourself happy?

Written by Chloe Horne, Accredited Practicing Dietitian at Blacktown. Article from August 2018

Can you eat yourself happy?

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According to the mental health organisation Beyond Blue, 45% of Australians will experience a mental illness at some point in their lives. More specifically they estimate that approximately 1 million Australians suffer from depression at any one time. This depression can affect every aspect of a persons’ life and is often treated with medications or social therapies such as seeing a psychologist or counsellor. But what if there was another more natural way to reduce the effects of depression?

What if you could eat yourself happier?

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Exercise and Mental Health

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from August 2018

Exercise and Mental Health

Shot of a senior woman looking thoughtful

One in five Australians will experience a mental health condition in any given year. Furthermore, one in two Australians will experience a mental health condition in their lifetime. With statistics like these, it’s important that we speak out more about our mental health and become aware of the ways in which we can manage these conditions.

Research has thoroughly demonstrated the positive benefits of exercise on mental health. Exercise can assist in managing conditions such as anxiety, depression, and PTSD, that's just to name a few.

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Exercise, Don’t Be a Hater!

Written by Matthew Craig, Exercise Physiologist at Thornleigh. Article from August 2018

Exercise, Don’t Be a Hater!

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More, and more, I see memes and jokes on social media about how people hate exercise and celebrate being lazy. And I’ll admit, I have a bit of a chuckle at photos of pugs kicking back eating pizza and all my friends commenting “this is so me”. But, are we encouraging an unhealthy lifestyle? And why do we hate exercise? Well, I’m writing this to tell you that if you hate exercise, you are doing something wrong.

f63f918acd7a833fd532d38faf6ed8a7--pizza-hut-funny-signsWhat mode is for you?

Exercise isn’t a one size fits all model.

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Exercise for Brain Health

Written by Taylor Moore, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from July 2018.

Exercise for Brain Health

Dementia Disease

In 2018 there is an estimated 425,416 Australians living with dementia and 250 joining this population each day. Around 6% of these Australian’s have younger onset dementia and this number is increasing.

So what is Dementia?

Dementia is actually not one disease. Dementia is a term used to describe a collection of symptoms caused by disorders of the brain. It affects thinking, behaviour, and the ability to complete activities of daily living enough to interfere with everyday life. Some of the risk factors for dementia include cardiovascular disease, smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol and family history.

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How speech pathology helps children reach their learning potential

Written by Siri Burke, Speech Pathologist at Blacktown. Article from July 2018

How Speech Pathology Helps Children Reach Their Learning Potential

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The early years of development are essential for laying a solid foundation for children to learn and grow. Giving children the best start means giving them the tools they require to succeed in the classroom, in the playground, and at home. Sometimes children need a helping hand to access those tools, and a speech pathologist may be the person to open that door. Speech and language are closely linked to behaviour, educational achievement, social interaction, and self-esteem. Extra support can make a difference for children who have a communication disorder or delay. 

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How Incorrect Breathing Contributes to Neck Pain

Written by Demi Ljilja, Exercise Physiologist at Campbeltown. Article from July 2018

How incorrect breathing contributes to neck pain

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Causes of Neck Pain 

Incorrect breathing is not the primary nor the only cause of neck pain and bad posture. There are many other factors such as muscular imbalance, biomechanical alignment, muscular tightness, mobility and movement proficiency that account for and contribute towards neck pain to a greater extent. All these factors need to be addressed prior to primarily focusing on breathing.

So what is the correct way to breathe at rest, during activity/exercise?

The correct way is by using the diaphragm during inhalation and exhalation, called diaphragmic breathing.

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Be Kind: Make Things Easier!

Written by Chloe Horne, Accredited Practicing Dietitian at Blacktown. Article from July 2018 

Be Kind: Make Things Easier!

Beautiful young woman making healthy meal in the domestic kitchen. She is cutting red pepper on the kitchen board. Looking at camera.

When we are trying to make changes to our lifestyle or diet, consistency is the key. Nearly every day in my practice, If I see someone who hasn’t met their goals over the previous weeks or months – 90% of the time its not because they are intentionally deviating from their plan, but something happens that is out of their control, or unexpected and suddenly meeting their goals just feels way too difficult. Or they try to do everything absolutely perfectly and it all becomes too much.

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Exercise for Individuals with Down Syndrome

Written by Matthew Craig, Exercise Physiologist at Thornleigh. Article from July 2018

Exercise for Individuals with Down Syndrome

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Thanks to the NDIS we are seeing a major growth in the awareness and engagement of exercise and healthy lifestyle in people with disabilities. However, studies have shown that physical activity, step totals per day and minutes of vigorous physical activity were all lower, and sedentary time per day was higher in people with Down syndrome (DS) (Phillips et al, 2011). Individuals with DS are significantly more likely to experience co-morbidities and cardio-metabolic conditions than their unaffected counterparts including but not limited to:

• Heart Defects
• Hypothyroidism
• Hypotonia (low muscle tone)
• Low bone mineral density
• Spinal issues
• Sleep disorders
• Mental health conditions
• Hypercholesterolemia
• Obesity

All of the conditions above have one thing in common, and that is that they can be improved, or at the very least, managed with physical activity. 

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Bowel Cancer & Exercise

Written by Sussanah Keppo, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from July 2018

Bowel Cancer & Exercise

Exercise for the Aging Population 2

Bowel cancer is the second most common cancer in Australia. It is associated with being a lifestyle condition, where modifiable risk factors are a definite way to decrease the risk. 

Some of the risk factors for bowel cancer include:

  • Sedentary Behavior
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol
  • Excess body fat

Exercise for all cancer is found to be the beginning of a vital therapy to improve immunity and promote cancer-fighting cells. Additionally, exercise can also aid with managing the side effects of various cancer treatments. The research states that it is clear that some activity is better than none and more activity is better than less (Hayes, Spence, Galvao, Newton 2009).

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Neuromuscular Control And Knee Health

Written by Hamish Hall, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from June 2018

Neuromuscular Control and Knee Health

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Strength and balance training for improved knee health

The tibiofemoral joint (knee) often becomes arthritic due to wear and tear of the cartilage, and clients often ask what I can do to improve this. I always tell my clients that improving the strength of the surrounding musculature and improving the neuromuscular control of the knee through balance training will significantly improve their knee health by providing support throughout a variety of movements.

What is neuromuscular control?

Neuromuscular control involves the body’s ability to contract the correct muscles during movements to provide stabilisation; this is done through the proprioceptive system.  

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