Human Anatomy

Pelvic floor strength and lower back pain – what’s the connection?

Written by Susannah Keppo, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from March 2019
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Studies have shown that there is an association between the strength of your pelvic floor muscles and lower back pain (Smith et al, 2006; Smith et al, 2007). This can be associated with lower back pain during pregnancy or simply anyone who has experienced lower back pain. Research shows that if urinary incontinence is improved through improved pelvic floor strength, it can reduce lower back pain.

I will discuss the four main groups of muscles that help to improve overall core stability, and in particular the pelvic floor muscles.

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Tendinopathy and Treatment

What is tendinopathy?

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from July 2019

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What is tendinopathy?

You may have heard of this common condition or possibly have been recently diagnosed with it. This clinical condition involves swelling and pain around a tendon which may arise from overuse. This overload can come from the structural and mechanical incapability of the attached muscle being able to transmit load. Pain from this condition can be partially attributed to the function, diminishing muscular strength and motor control which, collectively, reduces the function of the tendon. In this context, function means the ability of the muscle to produce strength required for the tendon to accumulate and release energy during bodily movements.

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Stroke and Exercise

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from July 2019

Why you should exercise after a stroke

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What is a stroke?

A stroke occurs when blood stops or significantly reduces flow in the brain. There is a loss of blood to parts of the brain and as a result, brain cells are damaged leading to impaired neurological function. A person who has experienced a stroke are commonly left with paresis (partial paralysis), paralysis, stiff muscles, muscle spasms and the inability to control muscle movement, usually in one side of the body. This often has a detrimental effect on person’s ability to complete daily activities or participate in social/ community events of everyday life to some extent.

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Exercise and bone health

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from July 2019

Exercise & Bone Health

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Exercise is a very important component that goes into improving/maintaining an individual’s bone health. Exercise is recognised as one of the most effective lifestyle strategies to help make bones as strong as possible, as well by reducing the risk of fractures later in life. Additionally, having strong bones is a great way to prevent/slow bone loss after menopause and can help improve an individual’s balance/coordination to help prevent the risk of falls. The correct dose of exercise can also help to speed up rehabilitation following a fracture.

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Do You Need A Scan For Your Lower Back Pain?

Written by Sandra Demian, Physiotherapist at Sylvania. Article from June 2019

Do You Need A Scan For Your Lower Back Pain?

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Many people believe when they have lower back pain that they need a scan (X-ray, CT, CAT or MRI) to find the cause but this is isn’t true. There are a few points we need to be aware of before we are quick to assume this is the next best step.

  • PAIN DOES NOT MEAN DAMAGE
    For most people, LBP isn’t clear but serious causes are very rare. More often than not, most cases will be better in approximately 4-6 weeks.
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How Does Incorrect Breathing Contribute To The Neck Pain?

Written by Demi Ljilja, Exercise Physiologist at Campbelltown. Article from March 2019

How Does Incorrect Breathing Contribute To The Neck Pain?

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Incorrect breathing is not the primary or only cause of neck pain and bad posture. There are many more factors such as muscular imbalance, biomechanical alignment, muscular tightness, mobility and movement proficiency that account for and contribute to the pain to a greater extent. All these factors need to be addressed prior to primarily focusing on breathing. So what is the correct way to breathe at rest, during activity/ exercise?

The correct way is by using the diaphragm during inhalation and exhalation, called diaphragmic breathing.

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Common Causes of Lower Back Pain

Written by Sandra Demian, Physiotherapist at Sylvania. Article from February 2019

Common Causes of Lower Back Pain

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One of the most common causes of lower back pain is when we do activities that place the most postural stress on it. This is frequently brought on by sitting for a prolonged period of time in a poor position. Positions that cause your lower back to be rounded and lose that natural hollow curvature in your lower back (lordosis) is the main problem. When you reduce your lordosis for long periods of time it becomes more difficult to restore the natural curvature of the spine.

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Peripheral Arterial Disease and Exercise

Written by Dean Katselas, Exercise Physiologist at Campbelltown. Article from October 2018

Peripheral Arterial Disease and Exercise

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to build up of plaques and narrowing of the arteries of critical areas of the body such as the legs, head, and organs. It is most common for PAD to affect the arteries of the leg decreasing oxygen supply to the calf, thigh, and buttocks.

Patients with PAD often have no symptoms however as the disease progresses they being to present with intermittent claudication (IC). IC is characterised by reproducible pain in the muscles of legs, most commonly the calved, during periods of weight-bearing activity that is relieved with rest.

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Cystic Fibrosis & Exercise

Written by Gabriel Pisanu, Exercise Physiologist at Croydon Park. Article from October 2018

Cystic Fibrosis & Exercise

What is it, the common treatments, effects on the exercise response, effects of exercise and exercise recommendations.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disorder of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTCR) gene, which is a gene that provides instructions to make the CFTCR protein. Impaired function to this protein can result in secretion of thickened mucus in the lungs and digestive tract, causing damage. This thickened mucus instigates chronic inflammation, infection, and finally, tissue destruction in the airways of the lungs, ultimately resulting in a deterioration in lung function.

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Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease & Exercise

Written by Adrian Choy, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from September 2018

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease & Exercise

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What is it?

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) is a group of genetic disorders presenting with chronic progressive neuropathy affecting motor and sensory nerves (1). The main features of CMT range from mild to severe in severity and involve progressive weakness and impaired sensory function in the upper and lower limbs (2) as muscle atrophy develops with areflexia (absence of neurologic reflexes) (1). The chronic nature of this condition leads to foot and toe deformity with likely involvement of the hands to follow.

Who can help?

Due to this disease being a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease, it is imperative patients receive regular assessments by a Physiotherapist, Exercise Physiologist, and Occupational Therapist to assist in maintaining range of motion for their benefit of appropriate functioning (1).

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