Home Exercises

Exercise Spotlight – Hip Bridge

Written by Adam Shepherd, Exercise Physiologist at Homebush. Article from April 2017

Exercise Spotlight: Hip Bridge

hip bridge 1

The Hip Bridge, also known as the Glute Bridge or Supine Hip Raise, is an easy yet effective exercise suitable for all ages and fitness levels. I’m here to give you a quick rundown on this wonderful exercise, why you should be doing it daily and some pointers on technique.

Firstly let’s take a look at what muscles are being used in this movement.

This exercise mainly targets the gluteus maximus (butt) with some help from the quadriceps (thighs) and the hamstrings (back of your legs).

Read the rest

The sitting epidemic – Can we just exercise more?

Written by Hamish Hall, Exercise Physiologist at Sylvania. Article from November 2016.

sitting epidemic

It is not uncommon for people to spend one-half of their waking day sitting, with relatively idle muscles. The other half of the day includes the often large volume of non-exercise physical activity. Given the increasing pace of technological change in domestic, community, and workplace environments, modern humans may still not have reached the historical pinnacle of physical inactivity.

There are a number of recommended exercise guidelines that are available to people to try and combat these cultural changes. For example, the American College of Sports Medicine recommends 30 minutes of moderate intensity exercise 5 days per week.… Read the rest

Stretching Is The Most Underrated Part Of Fitness

Written by Adam Shepherd, Exercise Physiologist at Homebush. Article from September 2016.
Young woman is practicing yoga at mountain lake

I personally believe one of the most underrated aspects of health and fitness, that we all overlook is stretching. Stretching regularly is equally as important to long term health as physical activity and nutrition. Ensuring that our bodies are able to move freely and without restriction, not only allows us to live day to day unimpeded, but also allows us to get the most out of our exercise.

Stretching allows us to improve our joint range of motion (ROM) otherwise referred to as ‘mobility.’ A lack of mobility can lead to overuse injuries, impingement and overall postural imbalances.… Read the rest

Reclaiming your Mobility Back

Written by Tess Hawkins, Exercise Physiologist at Homebush. Article from July 2016.
 

Senior couple on country bike rideDo you want to move more freely and easily? I can almost guarantee that you answered yes. Do you perform mobility exercises on a daily basis? The answer to this question should be just as definite as the first, but it’s likely that it isn’t. How can you expect to improve your mobility without performing mobility exercises regularly? The short answer is that you can’t! This means that you need to make a conscious change to your daily routine in order to see improvement. You might notice that I used the word daily, that isn’t a mistake.… Read the rest

How Releasing the Sub-scapularis can Free you from Shoulder Pain

Written by Sarah Hillman, Director at Sylvania. Article from July 2016.
 

The Sub-scapularisThe subscapularis is one of the four muscles of the rotator cuff that together have a role of keeping the head of the humerus within the glenoid cavity. The subscapularis is actually the largest and most powerful of the 4 rotator cuff muscles (Keating JF, JBJB, BR. 1993).

This muscle originates on the subscapular fossa of the scapula and inserts onto the lesser tuberosity of the humerus, which creates movement at the shoulder and more specifically the gleno-humeral joint into internal rotation and horizontal adduction.
The tightness of the subscapularis is often the culprit of limited external rotation and commonly results in shoulder impingement.… Read the rest

What Motivates You To Move?

Written by Alana Petrov, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from June 2016.
 

What Motivates You To MoveFor Christmas last year I received a Fitbit Charge HR and since then, I have only taken it off to shower. This activity wrist band tracks my workouts, measures my heart rate, the distance I have walked and the number of steps I have taken. It became something I couldn’t leave the house without - maybe it will have the same motivating effect on you.

Society today leads a remarkably sedentary lifestyle, spending way too much time seated and not enough time moving. If this is the case for you, then it’s time to break the unhealthy habit and find the motivational resources that will make you move.… Read the rest

96% of all People have Rolled their Ankle throughout their Lives

Written by Glenn Fairweather, Exercise Physiologist at Ashfield. Article from June 2016.
 

Rolled Ankle throughout their LivesWhether you’re active, inactive, young, old, male or female - almost everybody can think back to a time when they 'rolled their ankle'. If you’ve rolled you’re ankle before, it’s more than likely that you’ve experienced some level of lateral ankle sprain. I often hear people  say, “I just have a bad ankle,” “They’ve always been dodgy,” or, “They’ve been like that for a long time”. My question to you is: WHAT ARE YOU DOING ABOUT IT? Hence I’ve decided to provide some insight into what happens when you roll your ankle, and what to do about it.… Read the rest

Video: Improving Thoracic Rotation with Christian

Video by Christian Ramaci, Exercise Physiologist at Homebush. Video from May 2016.

Thoracic Rotation Exercise Video

Here's a video explaining how Thoracic Rotation is important for shoulder health, especially in field-based sports such as Cricket and AFL that require rotational shoulder movements. Enjoy the video. Ensure a better health status by contacting your nearest Optimum Health Solutions studio to make an appointment and obtain a full evidence-based exercise program personalised to your needs.
Like us on Facebook

Like us on Facebook

Read the rest

What if Exercise was Sold as a Pill?

Written by Kris Tejada, Exercise Physiologist at Werrington. Article from April 2016.
 

What if exercise was sold as a pill 2If exercise was sold as a pill, it would be the most popular drug on the market. Often I hear clients tell me about their prescriptive medication, dosages, frequencies, and types.  What if we can replicate the action of those medications with exercise, without the disastrous adverse effects?

Numerous studies support the notion that ‘prescriptive’ exercise as medicine can be a beneficial tool for chronic disease management. However, the concept is seldom applied with enough detail. For example, when a doctor prescribes a drug to a patient, there is a specific dose, volume, method of administration, frequency and duration to the treatment that ensures optimal benefit while mitigating risk.… Read the rest