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3 Running Tips to Help You Get Fit

Written by Shane Cassel, Exercise Physiologist at Blacktown. Article from June 2019

3 Running Tips to Help You Get Fit

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As a keen runner myself, I have taken this opportunity to summarize what I believe to be 3 key aspects of running that anyone can apply to their own health routine to assist in achieving their goals. Some are easier to apply than others, however, I will explain and give examples of how you would implement these into your routine. Enjoy!

1) Increase Gradually
There is a common method amongst runners and running coaches that increasing your total run volume by 10% each week is the best way to go about it. I have tried this method and think it is a sound idea to work with for anyone that isn’t being looked after by a running coach. If you’re just looking to get a personal best at this years City2Surf, then following this tip can help you stay healthy and get faster.

Paula-Radcliffe-775988 2) Don’t be a hero
This piece of advice might not be what you were expecting, so I will keep this simple. Don’t try and kick start your running program with a 90 minute, 15km run at a fast pace and expect to wake up the next morning able to walk. This will not work long term. It may seem like common sense (which isn’t that common, as the saying goes) but it is one of the major aspects of running that has made me more consistent and less injury-prone. Instead, start by running 2-3km every second day at a slow, comfortable pace to get your body used to running.

1986: Rob de Castella of Australia raises his arms in celebration as he crosses the line to win the gold medal in the Marathon event during the Commonwealth Games at the Meadowbank Stadium in Edinburgh, Scotland.

1986: Rob de Castella of Australia raises his arms in celebration as he crosses the line to win the gold medal in the Marathon event during the Commonwealth Games at the Meadowbank Stadium in Edinburgh, Scotland.

3) Cadence
Cadence is otherwise known as stride rate, usually expressed in strides per minute. Put simply, the more strides you take, the less force there is applied to your legs with each individual landing, thus reducing injury risk. Elite marathon runners will typically sit at around 180 steps per minute, I personally feel comfortable at around 170 steps per minute however this is individual so do what feels good for you.

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